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Why Did Google Update Search Quality Raters Guidelines?

Google’s “Search Quality Raters” guidelines (henceforth shortened to SQR guidelines) are something of a holy document in the SEO community. We live in a world where Google is pretty much the dominant force in search, dictating the trends and tropes we optimize our sites for (and influencing any other competitors who peek their heads out for search space), and it’s hard because they don’t tell us specifics about how their search algorithm works. Instead, we get hints and suggestions that indirectly tell us how to rank higher but mostly just prevent us from relying on black hat tactics to rank.

The Original SQR Guidelines

There have been a handful of “leaked” versions of the SQR document, and one official abridged version released by Google, but it wasn’t until last year that Google released the full SQR guidelines, in all their 160-page glory. Search marketers, once they got over being intimidated at the length, delved into the document to see what new insights they could uncover about how Google interprets the authoritative strength and relevance of websites.

(Image Source: Google)

The original document didn’t exactly revolutionize the search world, but it did bring up some important considerations and strategic takeaways we wouldn’t have gotten otherwise.  Much of the document did, admittedly, tread old ground by covering things like the importance of high-quality content and how Google views relevance to search queries from a semantic angle. However, there were some noticeable new insights:

Now, it appears Google has made some major modifications to the SQR document.

The Changes

Only four months after the document was originally published, Google has made significant changes. You might think Google added even more content to the 160-page behemoth, but actually, the document shrank, specifically to 146 pages.

Among the most important changes include:

If you’re interested in a much, much more thorough analysis of the changes, there’s a great post about it here.

Google’s Main Priorities

By examining Google’s motivations, we can better understand where the search platform hopes to be in the next few years, and get a jumpstart on preparing our SEO strategies for the future. For starters, Google is extremely fixated on the mobile user experience. With an expanded section on mobile compliance and a new frame of reference for local searches, it’s clear that Google wants mobile searchers to have an integrated, interactive, and seamless experience finding websites. The YMYL and EAT systems of rating content quality and significance are standbys, but the fact that Google is actively expanding these concepts is evidence that they’ll be around for the long haul.

It’s uncertain exactly how often Google will update their SQR guidelines document, or what other changes might be in store for our future as search marketers. Certainly, there may be major new additions for new technologies like apps and interactive content, but in the meantime, keep your focus on producing expert, authoritative, trustworthy content, and optimize your site for mobile user experiences.

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